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Drink Review: Glen Grant The Major’s Reserve

A no-age-statement entry-level Glen Grant, focusing on their mission to make light and easy-drinking whisky. This is a very accessible, approachable malt ideal for beginners or as an aperitif.

Glen Grant Single Malt Review:

An incredibly popular and widely available single malt. Completely devoid of any age statement on the bottle. Not as peaty as most young malts, but by no means soft or sweet. The profile carries water and burnt honey.

A very accessible Glen Grant, which is pleasant, but slightly lightweight in taste. The profile carries a hint of peat, but it is completely devoid of any oils.

Glen Grant Single Malt Review:

The essential Glen Grant from the 1940s. A peaty single malt, with honey, water and hay notes. The finish is slightly dry. Contains some of the traditional acrid notes common to older Glen Grant. A very approachable Glen Grant, with water and burnt honey influences. It is just as approachable as Glen Grant Golden 41 at the same price point.

Glen Grant Single Malt Review:

A nice Glen Grant, with some filmy caramel and honey. Much more approachable than the older 1980s vintage. This is the most compelling Glen Grant. Slightly oily, peaty but with a sense of good times and warmheartedness. This is a wallop of an old Glen Grant. This single malt exhibits fruit and caramel notes, but is very approachable and unassuming. The way of Glen Grant!

A great, light and peaty Glen Grant with fruit and caramel notes. An unassuming peaty Glen Grant, with water and honey influences. The finish carries a good burn. A light and sweet Glen Grant, with watery honey, oak and menthol nuances. The best Glen Grant since the 1980s. Watery, peaty and peatier. Oak, acetic and sweet.

Glen Grant Single Malt Review:

A very approachable Glen Grant, with cinnamon-vanilla whiskey and watery caramel influences. Great Glen Grant with some honey and minerality and a finish of smouldering wood. The perfect Glen Grant for a winter’s evening. This is one of the smoothest Glen Grants. A very approachable Glen Grant. The profile is quite soft, with notes of caramel, oak, honey and some watery vanillin notes.

Glen Grant Single Malt Review:

A light and soft Glen Grant. For what it is, it is very approachable and smooth. The palate is soft and the finish is smooth. Like some of the other Glen Grants people tend to compare it to. It’s a light and gentle Glen Grant. A soft, watery Glen Grant. Oak, caramel and honey influences.

A great Glen Grant, with some honey and oak notes on the nose and a slightly oily palate. The finish is slightly creamy. The palate carries wood, caramel, honey and oak. The finish carries a hint of peat smoke and oily woodiness. It is an oily, peaty Glen Grant. Oak, caramel and honey on the nose. The palate carries a hint of peat smoke and is a little soft.

Glen Grant Single Malt Review:

This is a light and soft Glen Grant, with a sharp watery palate. Contains some notes of floral honey. The finish carries a light bitterness. Great, light and peaty Glen Grant. A slight hint of minty peat. It’s a little harsh on the palate but carries some of the typical Glen Grant traits and influences.

A nice Glen Grant, with some peaty smoke on the nose. It is very approachable and carries some floral honey notes. The finish is pleasant, and it is a little dirty. Contains some water and oak. The finish contains some honey. A light and approachable Glen Grant, with a little water, oak and cinnamon notes on the nose. The palate carries some crisp oak flavours.

Glen Grant Single Malt Review:

A Glen Grant with a watery palate. The aroma carries some peatiness, but is quite gentle and subtle. Great, peaty Glen Grant. Like a lot of young single malts, this light, delicate Glen Grant. All the good stuff carrying over from the bottle, without any watery interference, and very approachable.

A watery, lightly peaty Glen Grant. Like a lot of other young malts, this is a little soft and watery. There are some subtle floral and candied notes that complement things nicely, but there isn’t the more pronounced peatiness characteristic of many young single malts.

Glen Grant Single Malt Review:

A Glen Grant with a watery palate. There are notes from the oak as well, but it is very neutral. More sweetness than peat, but not unlike Glen Grant whisky in the 1970s. Very soft, with a watery palate. Soft fruit and other sweetness. It is very approachable and very gentle, but it carries a sharp water note. It is oaky and peaty, but it’s a little watery and it has a wee bit of sweetness.

A light and soft Glen Grant, with some citrus and oak notes. The finish bears a slightly bitter edge. A peaty, watery Glen Grant with some citrus and green notes. It is a little sweeter than usual. A slightly watery Glen Grant. Slightly peaty Glen Grant. The palate carries a watery palate and some grassy notes. The finish contains some oak notes.

Written by Mark Adams

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