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Improve Your Digestion Thanks to These 13 Foods

What to eat to keep your tummy running smooth.

Digestion is that part of the eating process where once food is consumed, it resides inside of us, slowly dissolving, breaking itself apart so we can absorb all of the energy its components are ultimately made of and incorporate it to our precious bodies as fuel.

In and out of itself digestion is actually a very delicate process. It takes our bodies a considerable amount of energy to break down the food we ingest, that’s why you feel slow and heavy for a while after eating.

Poor digestion can be particularly punishing for those who suffer from it if they ingest the wrong foods, and that why they better be eating the right ones. Not only necessary for those with stomach issues, but anyone who needs to continue on the move after eating can benefit from consuming the best food to aid digestion. Feel energized and keep your body running smoothly with these foods.

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What are the best foods to aid digestion?

Salmon

This recommendation came from Sophie Bibbs from Sophie Bibbs – IBS + Digestive Health Coach, you can find out more about Sophie Bibbs here, or read more about their recommendation of Salmon below.
Salmon is an excellent source of Omega 3s. Omega 3s reduce inflammation and increase healthy gut bacteria, which can help to improve digestion.

Lemon

This recommendation came from Sophie Bibbs from Sophie Bibbs – IBS + Digestive Health Coach, you can find out more about Sophie Bibbs here, or read more about their recommendation of Lemon below.
Lemon is high in Vitamin C, which is an antioxidant that suppresses inflammation and is antimicrobial to support a healthy bacterial balance in your microbiome. Lemons are naturally detoxifying and help stimulate bile production which helps you digest your food. To get the most benefits from lemon, I’d recommend putting 1/4 lemon into a mug of warm water and drinking it as soon as you wake up in the morning. This will kick start your digestion and help to avoid indigestion throughout the day.

Ginger

This recommendation came from Sophie Bibbs from Sophie Bibbs – IBS + Digestive Health Coach, you can find out more about Sophie Bibbs here, or read more about their recommendation of Ginger below.
This an age-old remedy for digestive issues, including bloating. It can help relieve most symptoms associated with IBS, including stomach cramps, gas, bloating, constipation, and diarrhoea. Try ginger tea or grating fresh ginger into sauces and curries.

Apple Cider Vinegar

This recommendation came from Sophie Bibbs from Sophie Bibbs – IBS + Digestive Health Coach, you can find out more about Sophie Bibbs here, or read more about their recommendation of Apple Cider Vinegar below.
Apple cider vinegar is a natural antimicrobial, so helps reduce the bad bacteria in your gut (that can lead to bloating and digestive issues) and it helps your body create hydrochloric acid. Despite what many of us believe, people dealing with acid reflux, which can lead to bad digestion, are actually low in stomach acid. Therefore, adding more stomach acid with ACV can help you naturally increase the acid in your stomach, which will help you digest your food and absorb the nutrients.

Peppermint

This recommendation came from Sophie Bibbs from Sophie Bibbs – IBS + Digestive Health Coach, you can find out more about Sophie Bibbs here, or read more about their recommendation of Peppermint below.
Peppermint has antispasmodic properties, which make it ideal for relieving digestive problems. The cooling menthol in peppermint relaxes the intestinal tract, reducing the pain, gas, and constipation associated with IBS. It can actually be just as effective as prescription antispasmodics. Try making a fresh mint tea or adding fresh mint leaves to salads or smoothies.

Kefir

This recommendation came from Lisa Richards from The Anti-Candida Diet, you can read more about her recommendation of Kefir below.
Photo by Alison Marras on Unsplash
Kefir is a natural, fermented food that will help to replenish the ‘good bacteria’ in your gut. This milk-based fermented drink is much like a tangier version of yogurt.

You can make kefir at home, and in fact homemade kefir is usually a much better option than buying it from the store. This is because store-bought dairy products are typically pasteurized, whether they are organic or not. The pasteurization process destroys many of the valuable enzymes and probiotic cultures found in the kefir.

You can drink kefir itself or, if you find the flavor a little too tangy, you can mix it into a smoothie.

Yogurt

This recommendation came from Jamie Hickey from Truism Fitness, you can read more about the recommendation of Yogurt below.
Photo by Alisha Hieb on Unsplash
Many types of yogurt contain probiotics that are either part of the starter culture or added after it is pasteurized. If they are not added after pasteurization, many will lose the bacterial benefits due to the heat treatments they go under. Look for labels that say that the yogurt has live active cultures to ensure that it contains probiotics.

Yogurt contains two probiotics called bifidobacteria and lactobacillus. They have been shown to improve the uncomfortable symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, a common disorder that results in constipation or diarrhea.

Avocados

This recommendation came from Cindy Kennedy from Living With Lyme, you can find out more about Cindy Kennedy here, or read more about their recommendation of Avocados below.
Avocados add an excellent digestion quality because 1 cup of the delicious nutty fruit provides 50% of the daily fiber requirement. This once food for only royalty and newer to the US, has become more common in everyday diets.

Lean fish or Meat

This recommendation came from Beverly Friedmann from MyFoodSubscriptions, you can find out more about Beverly Friedmann here, or read more about their recommendation of Lean fish or Meat below.
Lean meats and fish are easier for the body to process than red meats, so chicken and fish like tuna or salmon is easier on the digestive system and a lot easier to process.

Whole grains

This recommendation came from Beverly Friedmann from MyFoodSubscriptions, you can find out more about Beverly Friedmann here, or read more about their recommendation of Whole grains below.
Whole grains are a great source of fiber, which naturally aids digestion, and can be found in foods like brown rice and whole wheat breads. While these are a great option to support digestion and gut health for most of us, it should be said that anyone with a gluten-sensitivity should remain wary.

Fenugreek

This recommendation came from Jordan Elist from Baaz Bites, you can find out more about Jordan Elist here, or read more about their recommendation of Fenugreek below.
Fenugreek is an herb used predominantly in Persian and Indian cuisine. In Persian cuisine, its use case is best showcased in Persian food’s most iconic dish, ghormeh sabzi, a herbed stew consisting of a medley of Middle East herbs, sauteed onions, diced mushrooms and red beans. Fenugreek is taken by mouth for digestive problems such as loss of appetite, upset stomach, constipation, and inflammation of the stomach. Its bitter taste is softened when it’s prepared as part of a broader meal, which in the case of Persian food is in the Persian classic ghormeh sabzi. Fenugreek’s benefits are largely driven by the fact that it is rich in fiber and antioxidants, thus helping rid the body of harmful toxins by strengthening digestive functions. Additionally, its lubricating properties help soothe the stomach and intestines, thereby preventing constipation.

Ajwain Seeds

This recommendation came from Priya Agrawal from The Spice Guide, you can find out more about Priya Agrawal here, or read more about their recommendation of Ajwain Seeds below.
This spice is wonderful and has been known for centuries to aid with gas and digestion. Often used in the Southern region of Asia, Ajwain Seeds has been scientifically proven to help with gas and digestion through a simple method. You can either cook with it, or just add to water and drink.

Kombucha

This recommendation came from Thea Boatswain from Elan Fitness and Nutrition, you can find out more about Thea Boatswain here, or read more about their recommendation of Kombucha below.
Kombucha is a probiotic type of tea that contains good bacteria that aids in digestion. Kombucha is made by fermenting yeast or sugar in gree or black tea. The results s a slightly tangy but probiotic-rich drink. Similar yogurt and Keifer the probiotics in kombucha can help with gas and bloating as well as aid the breakdown and absorption of nutrients by the gut.

Who contributed to this article?

Sophie Bibbs from Sophie Bibbs – IBS + Digestive Health Coach

Lisa Richards from The Anti-Candida Diet

Jamie Hickey from Truism Fitness

Cindy Kennedy from Living With Lyme

Beverly Friedmann from MyFoodSubscriptions

Jordan Elist from Baaz Bites

Priya Agrawal from The Spice Guide

Thea Boatswain from Elan Fitness and Nutrition

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