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Drink Review: High West Vodka 7000′

A very eye-catching bottle of vodka from US distiller High West, who also make bourbon and rye whiskey. High West 7000′ is so-named because the distillery’s bar is at exactly 7000ft in altitude in Utah’s Rocky Mountains. Uniquely, this vodka has been distilled from oats in a copper pot-still and is diluted without demineralising the water.

High West Vodka 7000′ Review:

After a quick decanting in the glass, what I’m presented with is a rich, clear golden liquid with an appetite for a good burger and a sense of humour in equal measure. The nose is very similar to that of a bourbon, except somewhat sharper in tone. There’s a boozy, toasted oat smell, a hint of turmeric and a strong whiff of hot milk. Delicious.

The taste is very smooth and rich with a hint of wheat and porridge. The texture is wonderfully oily, with delicious little creamy bubbles. Perhaps with a little ice, this would be perfect.

Overall, this is a great vodka. Not too sweet or oily, with a pleasant texture. It’s perfect on the rocks or for use in cocktails, perhaps replacing some of the Chambord in a White Russian. Obviously, this is pure High West and not simply ‘vodka’. Definitely worth a try.

Though High West has only been producing spirits for four years, the distillery has been honing its craft for over a decade. High West’s beautifully designed website provides an insight into the history and philosophy behind the distillery, as much as into their whiskies and vodkas. “We’re an American distillery on American soil using time-honored recipes with quality American ingredients”, reads their site. “We’re respectful of our predecessors, are proud of our heritage, and are always ready to learn from the new generation of distillers.”

High West produce a wide range of whiskies, from the award-winning Sazerac Rye, to their amaro and barrel finished whiskies. They also produce a wide range of aged and unaged vodkas, and the rather special High West Vodka 7000.

High West Vodka 7000′

The High West Vodka 7000 is produced in the Rocky Mountain distillery using traditional copper pot-still distillation. The water used is naturally filtered through the Rocky Mountains, it is then added to the spirit and distilled in a copper pot-still, followed by five times the amount of water as spirit to make it a neutral vodka.

The distilling process and the water used, create a final vodkas which appears to be a pure vodka, but is in fact a blend of corn, wheat and malted barley.

High West Vodka 7000′ is distilled from conventionally raised American corn with malted barley in a grain-to-glass pot still. It is then aged for two, bittersweet alpine-spring-fed years in new American Oak barrels.

It is a soft, smooth vodka that tastes of bread and ripe yellow fruit. It has a slightly oily texture in the mouth and because it is not distilled with demineralised water, it has larger and more interesting flavours in comparison to commercial vodkas.

High West Vodka 7000′ is distilled nine times and has a final ABV of 40%. It is bold, it is bold & fresh with a smooth texture and is a soft, well balanced flavour. Its flavours stand out compared to other vodkas which are more intense or harsh.

High West Vodka 7000′ has a 47% abv and is cool and fresh with smooth vanilla notes and soft, well balanced flavours. It has a smooth texture and a good mouth feel which is uncharacteristic of most other vodkas.

High West Vodka 7000′ is a unique vodka which stands out due to it’s ‘non-neutral’ water, it’s a tasty vodka which is full of flavour in comparison to most commercial vodkas available.

High West Vodka 7000′ is packaged in a unique, sky-blue glass bottle. The label is printed in black and is minimalistic. Aside from the distillery’s name embossed on the front, it’s decorated simply with a small red star.

It is clearly labelled at 47% ABV and the back label gives informative details about the vodka.

Written by Mark Adams

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