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10 Tasty Vegan Foods That Are Iron-Rich

Your Iron doses, delivered by vegan food.

Iron gets used by our bodies to help make the hemoglobin in the red blood cells, which then carry oxygen throughout your system, from our lungs to our muscles and other organs. Blood cells also use hemoglobin to help carry carbon dioxide from other parts of the body to the lungs, where we exhale it out.

It’s not a nutrient that you wanna be lacking. Not getting enough makes it difficult for your blood cells to deliver the oxygen your tissues and organs need. Symptoms you’ll notice can include feeling tired or not having any energy or easily catching infections or getting sick.

So, how does one get iron anyway? While you can correctly guess that the most widely promoted sources of it are, of course, not vegan-friendly, you’ll be pleasantly surprised that there are in fact many that are pretty much so. Get your system the Iron it needs to breathe from a vegan source.

Ladle of Contents

#1 Olives

Olives
Who suggested this product?
The Olives was recommended by Lisa Richards from Candida Die-Off. You can find out more about Lisa Richards here or read their product recommendation below.

Olives are rich in iron, with 3.3 mg per 100 grams. But they have lots of other health benefits too. They can lower the risk of heart disease, improve your digestion, protects against ulcers, and reduce your risk for colon, skin, and breast cancer.

#2 Lentil Burgers

Lentil Burgers
Who suggested this product?
The Lentil Burgers was recommended by Marly McMillen from Namely Marly. You can find out more about Marly McMillen here or read their product recommendation below.

Lentils are another great source of iron for vegans. Each cup of lentils provides 6.6 mg of iron, nearly 40% of the RDI for iron.

This Lentil Burger is flavorful and nutritious!

#3 Pumpkin seeds

Pumpkin seeds
Who suggested this product?
The Pumpkin seeds was recommended by Karen Gilman from Nutrilicious. You can find out more about Karen Gilman here or read their product recommendation below.

Pumpkin seeds are a great source of iron for those following a vegan diet. They are a good option as they can easily be added to food or eaten on their own, even on-the-go. To up the iron content of meals sprinkle some pumpkin seeds on top of dishes like salads, soups, pastas, stews and even vegan-yogurt. You can also grind them in a coffee mill and add to smoothies or make pumpkin seed butter. So many options with such a simple, nutritious food.

Or, as I sometimes do, make chocolate pumpkin seed bark. Sprinkle pumpkin seeds onto a cookie sheet. Melt dark chocolate and pour over pumpkin seeds add some sea salt and hemp seeds and allow to cool before breaking into pieces. Bonus, chocolate and hemp seeds are also good sources of iron!

#4 Dark Chocolate

Dark Chocolate
Who suggested this product?
The Dark Chocolate was recommended by Allie Gregg from MyEasyVeganDiet. You can find out more about Allie Gregg here or read their product recommendation below.

Dark chocolate contains about 20% of the rdi for iron per ounce! Plus its delicious 🙂 If you eat dark chocolate with a high vitamin C food such as oranges it increases the absorption of iron by 300%.

#5 Soy Beans

SoyBeans
Who suggested this product?
The SoyBeans was recommended by Dan DeFigio from Beating Sugar Addiction For Dummies. You can find out more about Dan DeFigio here or read their product recommendation below.

Soybeans (and foods derived from soybeans like natto, tofu, and tempeh) contain around 8.8 mg of iron per cup (that’s half of the RDI). Leafy green vegetables: Gram for gram, greens like spinach, kale, collard greens, and chard often have a higher iron content than foods typically associated with high iron, such as meat and eggs. Although vegetables contain non-heme iron (which is less easily absorbed), they are also generally rich in vitamin C, which helps enhance iron absorption.

#6 Lentil Walnut Bolognese

Lentil Walnut Bolognese
Who suggested this product?
The Lentil Walnut Bolognese was recommended by Megan Sadd from Carrots & Flowers. You can find out more about Megan Sadd here or read their product recommendation below.

Lentil Walnut Bolognese as a vegan food high in iron! Lentils are a fantastic source of iron and the Vitamin C from the tomato sauce increases the absorption of iron.

#7 Loma Linda Hearty Stew

Loma Linda Hearty Stew
Who suggested this product?
The Loma Linda Hearty Stew was recommended by Laura Lapp from Atlantic Natural Foods. You can find out more about Laura Lapp here or read their product recommendation below.

Loma Linda just debuted their line of shelf-stable, plant-based Meal Starters and Meal Solutions. At just $1.99-4.49 per open-and-eat pouch, Loma Linda meals provides quick, heat-and-eat meals. They’re also non-GMO, gluten free and pack 6g-9g of plant-based protein per serving. When going through the nutrient values of our products I noticed they’re all fairly high, about 2-3mg of iron (12-15% of the daily value) but the Hearty Stew has 4mg (20% of DV).

#8 Tofu

Tofu
Who suggested this product?
The Tofu was recommended by Nate Masterson from Maple Holistics. You can find out more about Nate Masterson here or read their product recommendation below.

Being vegan means you can’t get Haem iron, which is the type of iron that is more readily absorbed. It’s mostly found in poultry and fish. Tofu contains non-haem iron. If you want to enhance the iron absorption for non-haem iron, you should consume it with vitamin C. Vitamin C is found in citrus fruits, broccoli, cabbage, spinach, and so much more.

#9 Spinach

Spinach
Who suggested this product?
The Spinach was recommended by Becky Kerkenbush from Watertown Regional Medical Center. You can find out more about Becky Kerkenbush here or read their product recommendation below.

Contain more iron when cooked than raw. Absorbed better when consumed with a source of Vitamin C (add those fruits and vegetables!).

#10 Beans

Beans
Who suggested this product?
The Beans was recommended by Becky Kerkenbush from Watertown Regional Medical Center. You can find out more about Becky Kerkenbush here or read their product recommendation below.

Beans like soybeans, kidney beans, lentils, chickpeas. Not only provides iron, but also protein and fiber.


Who contributed to this article?

Lisa Richards from Candida Die-Off

Marly McMillen from Namely Marly

Karen Gilman from Nutrilicious

Allie Gregg from MyEasyVeganDiet

Dan DeFigio from Beating Sugar Addiction For Dummies

Megan Sadd from Carrots & Flowers

Laura Lapp from Atlantic Natural Foods

Nate Masterson from Maple Holistics

Becky Kerkenbush from Watertown Regional Medical Center

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