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Drink Review: Revel Stoke Spiced Whisky Liqueur

Named for the Revelstoke mountain resort in British Columbia, this spiced Canadian whisky goes for more of a spiced rum approach than many of its competitors, layering on vanilla and caramel for a really flavoursome liqueur.

Revel Stoke Whiskey Liqueur Review:

Named for the Revelstoke mountain resort in British Columbia, this spiced Canadian whisky goes for more of a spiced rum approach than many of its competitors, layering on vanilla and caramel for a really flavoursome liqueur.

From the first spray, the oak comes through with a full bodied kick, which is overpowered by the caramel. However, a second spritz showcases that vanilla and pepper which is characteristic of the sprawled pepper mash.

The taste is quite muted and soft – for the most part. Initially, the ginger and pepper spice seems to dominate the dram, and the vanilla and caramel sit back quite far, but still lend a great deal of flavour to this drink. The taste isn’t overly complicated, but it’s strong and powerful.

The nose is caramelised with a unique sweet tobacco taste, almost roasted, which is complemented with a coffee and tobacco edge. You get the oak clearly, but it isn’t too overwhelming, and the pepper spice is very present. It’s a very mature Scotch.

The taste is a bit too harsh and slightly bitter. The caramel is hard to taste and the vanilla is also a bit lacking, with the strong presence of the oak coming through far too much.

It’s quite funky with heavy peat and Brine on the nose. The nose is interesting but perhaps a little flat. The taste is a little bitter with a strong oaky finish.

Revel Stoke Spiced Whisky Liqueur:

Named for the Revelstoke mountain resort in British Columbia, this spiced Canadian whisky goes for more of a spiced rum approach than many of its competitors, layering on vanilla and caramel for a really flavoursome liqueur.

From the first spray, the oak comes through with a full bodied kick, which is overpowered by the caramel. However, a second spritz showcases that vanilla and pepper which is characteristic of the sprawled pepper mash.

The taste is quite muted and soft – for the most part. Initially, the ginger and pepper spice seems to dominate the dram, and the vanilla and caramel sit back quite far, but still lend a great deal of flavour to this drink. The taste isn’t overly complicated, but it’s strong and powerful.

The nose is caramelised with a unique sweet tobacco taste, almost roasted, which is complemented with a coffee and tobacco edge. You get the oak clearly, but it isn’t too overwhelming, and the pepper spice is very present. It’s a very mature Scotch.

The taste is a bit too harsh and slightly bitter. The caramel is hard to taste and the vanilla is also a bit lacking, with the strong presence of the oak coming through far too much.

It’s quite funky with heavy peat and Brine on the nose. The nose is interesting but perhaps a little flat. The taste is a little bitter with a strong oaky finish.

I really enjoy this whiskey. It’s sweet, strong, and robust. It’s woody, smokey, and spicy, and it really sits well as a nice sipping drink. I would describe it as a slightly rough, heavy sweetness. Definitely not a dessert drink, but it does sit well with a piece of dark chocolate or a nice piece of pork. Not much else to say, the pictures really do speak for themselves.

Because it’s a liqueur this is more for a cool summer’s day. It’s strong and woody, but it follows the style of a nice sipping drink. I wouldn’t say that it’s overly complex, but it is a good one to have in your bar – especially on a hot summers day.

Written by Mark Adams

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